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on leaks by edward snowden. in a moment we will be joined by journalist glenn greenwald who first broke the snowden story. first, we turn to saturday's protest in washington. it was organized by the stop watching us coalition. jesselyn radack, a former justice department who now works for the government accountability project, read a message from edward snowden. >> we are here to remind our government officials that they are public service -- servants. this is about the unconstitutional, unethical, and immoral actions of the modern- day surveillance state, and how we all must work together to remind the government to stop them. know,bout our right to our right to associate freely, and to live in a free and open democratic society. [applause] witnessing an american moment in which ordinary people from high school to high office stand up to oppose a dangerous trend in government. we are told what is unconstitutional is not illegal. but we will not be fooled. we have not forgotten the fourth amendment in our bill of rights prohibits government that only from searching our personal effects
administration is rejecting calls to plant -- grand, sita nsa leaker edward snowden. in a letter given to a german lawmaker last week, snowden called on the u.s. to drop charges against him, writing "speaking the truth is not a crime." on sunday, dan pfeiffer ruled out clemency and said snowden should return to face criminal charges. in some of the latest snowden's disclosures, the "new york times" reports the nsa intercepted the talking points of view into secretary -- you would secretary-general ban ki- moon ahead of a meeting with president obama in april. we will have more on the story with the reporter scott shane after the headlines. a newly disclosed document shows the british government justified detaining the partner journalist glenn greenwald by accusing him of espionage and terrorism. in august, david maranda was on his way home to brazil when he was held from his nine hours at london's heathrow airport. he faced repeated interrogation, had many personal items seized, .ncluding some -- thumb drives an internal police order authorizing greatest attention from that they says -
countries. the resolution is expected to be voted on later this month. >> n.s.a. leader edward snowden is speaking up and reaching out. the germans are interested in bringing him to berlin if he tells them about the surveillance of german chancellor angela merkel. >> david chater reports from moscow. >> edward snowden shows every sign of going native. the snapshot showing him enjoying a river cruise in moscow. he held a meeting with an mp from the green party. he said their discussions were revealing. at a press conference the mp said edward snowden would about willing to go germany as a witness to the bugging of angela merkel's phone by the u.s. >> translation: he told me he could imagine coming to germany if it was clear he could remain here in safety. this means granting free passage and asylum. the interior minister could offer this and fulfil the moral obligation to help him. >> it's reported edward snowden is starting a job in st. petersburg as a technical advisor to russia's version of facebook. he may not be happy with the news that the federal security service in moscow is be
couldn't breathe at points because of excitement and shock. >> the source was edward snowden. >> the nsa specifically targets the communications of everyone. it ingests them by default. it collects them in it's system and it filters them and it analyzes them and it measures them and it stores them. >> up to that point, the director of national intelligence, who oversees nearly 20 u.s. intelligence agencies, had been telling the public a different story. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? >> no sir. >> it does not? >> not wittingly. there are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect, but not wittingly. >> after the snowden revelations, clapper apologized, explaining that he'd given the "least untruthful" answer. >> i sitting at my desk certainly had the authorities to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president if i had a personal email. >> so everything from learning all your metadata, with whom you're speaking, who's emailing you, where you are when you do it, how long yo
-kept secrets are out. by now, most of the world has heard the name edward snowden. the former national security agency contractor who released thousands of classified documents about government surveillance in one of the most significant leaks in u.s. history. he's been charged with espionage and has been living in russia under temporary asylum. the american journalist at the center of the story lives in brazil. >> we've had to come to rio to speak to glenn greenwald. he hasn't returned to the united states since he broke the story about the nsa surveillance programs for fear of being prosecuted. >> the nsa's goal really is the elimination of privacy globally. it is literally a system designed to monitor all forms of human behavior inside the united states, which is the ultimate surveillance state. >> last december, glenn greenwald received an email from a person who didn't identify himself. >> we still didn't know who he was, where he worked, but he was saying he had access to large amounts of very sensitive surveillance information that show the united states government was violating the law
on information from edward snowden, following allegations that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. the white house denies that. congressman peter king and former vice president dick chaney said the u.s. should stop apologising for the nsa surveillancism. >> overall intelligence is important and need to be preserved. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states, but france and germany and throughout europe. the french are ones to talk - the fact is they've carried out spying against the united states - both government and industry. >> jeanne shaheen of new hampshire takes a different stance, calling on the nsa to come clean about surveillance programs. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. we have repair twork do. we have hard questions we need to ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> meanwhile -
edward snowden may have information about how much cooperation european governments gave to the surveillance. >> as they wrap up meetings on capitol hill, what are they saying after the first meeting emerges. >> reporter: this is part of an european inquiry set up a few months ago. this has been long planned. the first stop at chairman of the house intelligence mike rogers who said he didn't understand what all the fuss was about, that they should be glad europe is spying on them because its keeping them safe. not much there. there is talk of ongoing dialogue but the chairman of european union foreign affairs has said confidence has been damaged. >> has anything been said that their spying headquarters have been linked so they can share the spy information. >> reporter: that's the big question, what we haven't learned from the edward snowden is the amount of cooperation from the european governments and the national security agency. this is something that they have been very concerned about. as far as world leaders who are talking about things, angela merkel and so on, yo
not been a highlight of the edward snowden documents but shows how america is using the information to collect foreign information. >> p.j. crowley, european leaders are expressing outrage. how much of that is legitimate? how many of them had known that this is happening? >> well, there is an intelligence issue, and beneath the surface there is a deep relationship among intelligence that serve american interests as well as european interests, a lot of cooperation and information sharing, which is why there has been progress in combating terrorism. we're in a better position than, say, 12 years ago. the united states has been through this before with wikileaks. you had 250,000 state department documents, many classified cables. you've got awkward conversations. how could european leaders say how could you call me vain. but obviously at the end of the day interest drive relationships but politics makes relationships. you're seeing steps being taken politically to try to manage this, and stabilize the situation. it will obviously take some ti time. >> mike rogers, chairman of the intel
on other nations, especially our allies and friends. it's all coming from one man, edward snowden and the secrets he made off before he left as a u.s. intelligence analyst. now the white house is scrambling to soothe feelings while fielding questions about how much the president knew. we begin in washington tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the white house is under fire from its closest allies. for the first time the president is promising to limit the nsa's extraordinary reach saying what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. that likely means not spying on foreign leaders who happen to be good friends and allies. across europe, an uproar today. the u.s. ambassador to spain under siege. called on the carpet to explain reports that the nsa was vacuuming up telephone data, tracking 60 million calls in spain in less than a month according to el mundo. germany today called for an investigation into nsa's tapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. the interior minister said the chancellor
>>> former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden has a new job. he is working in technical support at one of russia's largest websites. edward snowden lawyers would not name the company but says that he started work tomorrow. the 30-year-old was granded asylum in moscow this year. he is facing espionage charms in the united states. >> the troubled health care website is back. for now. a networking problem caused the website to crash on tuesday night stopping people from submitting applications. the service was restored yesterday and others not back on line until this morning. there have been major issues with the site reventing people from registering and applying for insurance coverage. >> if you plan to fly for the holiday, here is the magic date: the lowest fares will be found if you book before november 12. a domestic round trip flight costs an average of $314 if you book before then. prices will suddenly spike on november 13th based on air fare the past three years. also, you will find the best deals if you fly on december 23rd or december 24th right before christmas day. >> meteorologist mike
's leaders. this after documents from edward snowden suggest that the u.s. was bugging angela merkel xfone -- angela merkel's a phone. they met to ask about the claims and edward snowden said he was willing to help the german government investigate. police in california have begun investigations into the shooting at los angeles airport that killed a security officer and disrupted more than 700 flights across the united states. the alleged shooter, a 27-year- old man stormed into a terminal, killing one officer and injuring at least three other people. the police shot and injured him before taking him into custody. police say he had more than 100 rounds of ammunition. back in the headlines as sectarian violence has claimed 7000 lives this year alone. the most violence they have seen since 2008. they are struggling to push back al qaeda. hase minister al-maliki called for more support from the united states. october was the bloodiest month in iraq in nine years, as 7000 people died in the strikes between sunni and shiite. the government of a rack cannot get the violence under control on thei
forward. for edward snowden, it's a fate he was willing to risk. >> you live a privileged life. you're living in hawaii, in paradise, and making a ton of money. what would it take to make you leave everything behind? the greatest fear that i have regarding the outcome for america, of these disclosures, is that nothing will change. >> i think what the nsa in our nation is trying to do is protect our people and other people. you know, i would say, do you speak arabic? >> do i? no. maafi mushkila kil shi tamam, alhamdulillah. and so from my perspective, we want to have a world where there are no problems, where everything is ok, and we can say thanks. so from our perspective, we have to work together as nations to do that, and it takes intelligence and the least intrusive way we could think of was metadata. if, if anyone has any ideas how they can do it better, let us know. >> but what price are people willing to pay for security? and what could mass surveillance do to the nature of american society, and its promises of democracy, liberty and privacy? >> if you allow the government, th
, edward snowden manifest tow of truth is what he is calling it. he is ghademanding the u.s. dro espionage charges against him and why he is suggesting he is is not criminal. >>> a bizarre security breach at o'hare airport. an alligator on the loose in terminal 3! what? wait, wait, wait... no, no, no, wait, wait. (baby crying) so you can deposit a check... with the touch of a finger. so you can arrange a transfer in the blink of an eye. so you can help make a bond... i got it. that lasts a lifetime. the chase mobile app. so you can. ♪ hey lady! noooo! no! [ tires screech ] ♪ nooo! nooo! nooo! hey lady, that's diesel! i know. ♪ ♪ okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ] aflac. [ sassily ] aflac. uh huh. [ under his breath ] i am so fired. you're on in 5, duck. [ male announcer ] when you're sick or hurt, aflac pays you cash.
for wednesday. >> nsa whistleblower edward snowden has been charged with espionage. but he wants to be let off the hook saying they are looking to criminalize a local speech in a letter friday the northbounding sa whistleblower asked for international hope to persuade the us to give him clemency. >> he violated u.s. law. he should return to the united states and face justice. >> snowden has also indicated that he would like to testify before congress withoabout the surveillance program but lawmakers wonsay that won't hap either. >> houston taking on the colts. the texans were rolling through the first half. andre johnson pulls in his third touchdown of the game. texans up 21-3. what we told you about texan's head coach gary kubiak collapsing it's down there from houston they go on to drop their 6th straight. 27-24. raider rs taking on the eagles. it was the colts the eagles quarterback shutting down the raider's defense for a record tieing 7 touchdown passes. connecting with riley cooper for three of his 7 touchdowns. finishing the became 406 yards, 7 touchdowns no interceptions. >> it was a d
as the leaks keep on coming from edward snowden from the top adviser to the president about what the president knew and when he knew it. first today's trivia question. what is the most populous state with one woman in its congressional delegation. the first person to tweet the correct question will get the on air shout out. the answer and more coming up next. [ female announcer ] who are we? we are the thinkers. the job jugglers. the up all-nighters. and the ones who turn ideas into action. we've made our passions our life's work. we strive for the moments where we can say, "i did it!" ♪ we are entrepreneurs who started it all... with a signature. legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses, turning dreamers into business owners. and we're here to help start yours. i remember thinking there's a lot i have to do... check my blood sugar, eat better. start insulin. today i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said with levemir® flexpen... i don't have to use a syringe and a vial. levemir® flexpen comes prefilled with long-acting insulin taken once daily for
, you heard what senator feinstein said about granting clemency to edward snowden and bringing him back to help investigate the national security agency. >> well, the only investigation here is to what extent he knew about the material that he stole and who else he worked with. certainly the russians are not allowing him to stay in the country of russia because they think he's just a nice guy there. is clearly more to this story. i think that is a -- if he wants to come back and open up to the responsibility of the fact that he took and stole information, he violated his oath, he disclosed classified information, that by the way has allowed three different terrorist organization, affiliates of al qaeda to change the way they communicate, i'd be happy to have that discussion with him. but he does need to own up with what he's done. if he wants to talk through why he did it those things that would be the appropriate time and the appropriate way to do it. >> schieffer: you would not be willing to give him any kind of clemency, i take it? >> no. i don't see any reason. i wouldn't do that
information from whistle blower edward snowden may soon emerge detailing their cooperation in the dragnet surveillance of their citizens if not the monitoring of their leaders' phone calls. al jazeera, washington. >> a british man has been arrested and charged with hacking in to the computer systems of several federal agencies including nasa and the u.s. army. 28-year-old lovie love was arrested last friday at his home northeast of london he was invited in new jersey where he used a serve tore carry out the attacks. love also faces charges related to attacks in virginia it cost the government millions of dollars. >> jersey hayes begun in to the hacking scandal that brought down the news of the world in 2011. eight people, including two of the papers former editors are now on trial. rory has more now from london. >> reporter: the defendants arrived on time for their trial but the storms that hit the u.k. southeast overnight meant that not everyone could be so prompt. proceedings got underway maybe three hours late. no matter, this is likely to be one of the u.k.s longest trials in years. t
administration is trying to sal silence doubts about the rollout and edward snowden's latest bombshell. they listened in on friendly global leaders and american's top spy said there is nothing new. i'll talk to glenn greenwald, what he says. >>> catch a wave and you're sitting on top of the world and catch this wave and you may land in the record books. i'll talk to a surfer on what it is like to hang ten on a 100-foot ocean wave, only here. >>> we begin with big new developments in the obama care story. this is different from the political war fair you see night after night on the partisan news channels because health care reform is so i'm fortunate we're doing what we can to turn down the noise and turn up the facts. item one, a document that clearly shows when the white house got the warning the healthcare.gov website was a disaster in the making. >> reporter: cnn learned at the obama administration was warned in september the obama care website wasn't ready to go live. the main contractor, cgi issued this confidential report to the agency overseeing the healthcare.gov rollout. it w
from edward snowden has gone on to what anyone realize beyond the wiretapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. it's hard to believe a terrorist would call her up and say i'm a terrorist and just that i would let you know we are going to blow up a building. doesn't sound very likely that they should be doing that. at least that's my opinion. >> host: what do you make of the revolution's overall but the work the nsa is doing and how that either helps or contributes to what the work at the fbi and the cia do? >> guest: well, the fbi is an important agency obviously. it seemed to miss revelations that they've gone beyond what anyone suspected they could be doing. i personally don't think the correction of what they call metadata, which is like every phone call, you know, is not overheard. that seems to me to be going on what his message very. if they have a bad guy, they can go to the foreign intelligence surveillance court and put on for a warrant and they'll get a warrant in almost every case. to wiretap that person. they don't need to know that i was talking to my brother
that killed a u.s. ambassador. >> accused nsa leaker edward snowden making new friends and maybe looking for a new home. germany maybe? >> and unearthed a drug tunnel between mexico and the united states that is so sophisticated, it is being called a supertunnel. we're going to take you on a tour. welcome to around the world". i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers with us all week. >> first we're going to get to this, benghazi, libya, it was just last ept, four americans were killed in a terrorist attack. one of them the u.s. ambassador. >> today a lot of pressure from republicans in congress to hear directly from cia operatives who were in libya during the attack and also afterwards. so far they have not talked to congress. >> we here at cnn have reported the cia has specifically told those operators to keep quiet. drew griffin is with the cnn investigations unit. drew, first of all, excellent reporting on all of this. they're pushing back right now on what you're reporting. what are they saying? >> being complet
. >>> coming up on "new day," a few proceed from edward snowden. he says he's no criminal. wait until you hear our response from the leaders in the nation's capitol. he says he is sorry for past mistakes for smoking co-cable. he will not resign and he wants the public to see the alleged evidence. t thing i need. seriously? let's take this puppy over to midas and get you some of the good 'ol midas touch. hey you know what? i'll drive! i really didn't think this through. brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling) hall we do is go out to dinner.? that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...what? he's using you. he probably has a citi thankyou card and gets 2x the points at restaurants. so he's just racking up points with me. some people... ugh! no, i've got it. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards american express credit card, every purchase earns you 2% cash back, which is deposited in your fidelity account. is that it? actually... there's no annual fee and no l
intelligence officer, edward snowden. then, the embarrassin embarrassa merkel phone tapping. barack obama is ordering a,. >> trying to get some answers. they've said that trust needs to be rebuilt. but in a few hours' time the director of national intelligence and the director of the nsa will face congressional grilling. we will talk with our correspondent in washington after this story by bernard smith. >>> this could be about to end. in an interview, president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose: to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> this has partly been prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of chancellor angela merkel's phone in 2010. officials say that's not true and the white house only discovered surveillance in the summer and the bugging of merkel's phone soon after. the delegation that's visiting is concerned about the surveillance of tens of millions of its citizen
, ever since edward snowden exposed them. calls to rein them in grew louder when it was revealed the u.s. was eavesdropping not only on enemies, but allies. on capitol hill two of america's top intelligence officials made an impassioned defense and here's homeland security correspondent bob orr. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence today confirmed the n.s.a. has long spied on friendly foreign leaders to understanding the thinking of both enemies and allies. >> it's invaluable to us to know where countries are coming from, what their policies are, how that would impact us across a whole range of issues. >> reporter: german chancellor angela merkel has accused the u.s. of monitoring her personal cell phone. senate intelligence committee member, republican susan collins, said today that's inappropriate. >> there's absolutely no justification for our country to be collecting intelligence information on the leaders of some of our closest allies. >> reporter: but before the house intelligence committee, clapper was unapologetic. >> some of this reminds me a lot of classic movie
the powers of the nsa and edward snowden is now. offering to help germany. >> and president obama shook hands with the leader of iraq for the first time in two years. >> secretary of state john kerry is conceding that some u.s. spying has gone too far. kerry was speaking at a conference in london. he was defending the programs but the white house has concluded that reviews and changes are needed. >> in some cases i acknowledge as does the president some of these actions have reached too far and we are going to make sure that that doesn't happen in the future. >> lawmakers on capitol hill are taking up the spying being a at this times. the senate committee has limited how long the nsa can keep their data record. records. the bill will expand penalties for illegal spying. it falls short from real reform. >> one of the critics is journalist dplejournalist glen . the more information you collect about innocent people the harder it is to actually find the people that actually mean to do you harm. and the metaphor that surveillance officals use they are hooking for a needle in the hay stack. the la
. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. national security director told the committee the content of phone calls remain secret, in a virtual lock box unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that he says is rare. >> they would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulatable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign or al-qaeda terrorists group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the hearing, there was relatively little discussion a
recently of a man looking like edward snowden doing his grocery shopping and now it seems he's got himself a normal job. but it's likely given the fact that he's an i.t. specialist he's not going to be sitting in some big room with a load of other techies, he's probably going to do it remotely. there are security concerns around him, so he's probably not going to be very clear or very public about where he's working from. >> it sounds like he's going to stay in russia, forever i mean. it's starting to sound more like that at least. >> well, his father, lawrence snowden, came to visit him a few weeks back and said he was doing very well in russia, he was grateful to the russian authorities for having granted him asylum that he felt he could lead a normal life here and that he was able to find a job here, and there have been a lot of companies who have been public about the fact that they've been looking to recruit edward snowden. he's obviously a name that you would want to have up there on your text specitech specialist and the russian version of facebook tried to recruit him earlier on. t
second term in peril. edward snowden has this new manifesto that is out from russia, calls for reform in surveillance justify his leaks of classified information. we will see if he agrees with him on that. and the changing landscape of designer fashion. the top names in the country, here with us this hour to talk about that. all that and dagen mcdowell this hour on "markets now." all right. dagen: we're giving you a makeover. connell: that would be great. get him to work on that. dagen: we put you in like a camo jacket. the market slight losses here, we are also getting news on that settlement with the justice department, nicole petallides has you covered at the new york stock exchange. lauren: the dow down to the downside. the nasdaq and the s&p squeezing out some gains although very minimal. talking fractional news for the nasdaq and the s&p with the up arrow's up nearly two points as the s&p is up .34. a third of a point. very small moves despite the fact everybody still continues to believe you will not see any tapering from the fed anytime soon. some of the steel stocks doing ver
something that comes to mind that what we now know about spying comes from the leaks of edward snowden. >> yeah, glenn greenwald lives in rio and has all of snowden's documents. snowden is on a one-year temporary asylum and not giving any interviews. and greenwald has become the spokesperson for this. so we went down to rio. we were fortunate enough to spend a couple of days with him. and just kind of see what his life is like right now. but it's really fascinating, because when history looks back on this, greenwald will be a big part of this. >> also in your show your are going to talk about the impact on washington and what you found here in this environment was a bit of a surprise. >> it is a surprise. it cuts across the partisan lines so broodly. we interviewed allen west the former tea party representative and allen grayson who is a representative from florida in the house right now, and their views were very, very similar on this. that it's unconstitutional it lax oversight from congress, not enough is being done about it. the only people who seem to support it are people who hav
currently in the u.s. senate. >>> a growing fury after more allegations growing out of edward snowden's leaked documents. this time about the nsa tapping world alabalealleys. fault lines correspondent explores what it is like to live under constant surveillance. ♪ >> in many ways the nsa surveillance story can seem abstract. sure the sgovment collecting information, but what does that really mean for someone's life? to fine out we went to meet a group of people who definitely know they are being spied on. >> after 9/11 it wasn't just the nsa that increased surveillance. here at the city level in new york, the nypd brought in to senior officials from the cia to help spy on its own citizens. the program is targeting one community, muslims. secret documents show that the nypd is conducting surveillance of entire muslim neighborhoods. >> they visited book stores, cafes, hookah joints, of course mosques. >> reporter: and record conversations using hidden microphones, collect the names and phone gragaits. >> how were they reacting to foreign events abroad, the egyptian revolution or the c
almost all based on information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggest the u.s. has been spying on many countries and their leaders, including important u.s. allies. >> the white house denies the report that president obama knew the n.s.a. was eavesdropping on german leader angela merkel. we have the latest. >> a nine member delegation will meet with senior government officials over allegations of widespread spying against leaders. new allegations surfaced that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. according to the wall street journal, the president was unaware the n.s.a. was spying on world leaders and ordered the agency to stop some of the monitoring programs after learning of them. >> the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> it's not just the europeans who are upset. over the weekend, thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> against mass surveillance and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> some memb
eavesdropped on their voicemails. >>> edward snowden could earn a ticket out of russia if we agrees to testify about the u.s. and its spying. german lawmakers are investigating reports that the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone, and they said they would grant snowden asylum if he would be their star witness. >>> the case of a little girl named maria living in a greek roman community, has thrust the roma people back into the spot light. claudio lavanga has the story. >> reporter: miriana halilovic likes to welcome guests with coffee, but she is forced to serve it outdoors. inside the trailer she calls home there is barely space for her new-born twins. she hopes to be relocated to a social public housing are quickly fading away. >> reporter: they say i'm roma is for italian. but i'm an italian citizen too. i have a right to a decent home. >> reporter: she is one of more than 4,000 members of the roma community who live in overcrowded camps infested by rats. bouts of hepatitis a and other diseases, the air is filled with the smell of burning rubbish. this camp was built to house 600 people,
national security agency contractor, edward snowden, one former aide to the chancellor said that snowden has done the western world a great service and it's up to us to help him. today on "face the nation," rejecting the idea that snowden be granted any clemency. >> can he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee. that didn't happen. and now he's done this enormous disservice to our country and i think the answer is no clemency. >> a republican counterpart in the house also dismissed the idea. >> no, i don't see any reason. you know, we -- i wouldn't do that. >> the suspect in friday's fatal shooting of a tchl sa altsa age has been charged with murder. paul ciancia wrote a note indicating that he intended to die during the attack. he survived after being wounded by the police. >>> four prominent scientists, including james hansen, distributed a joint letter citing the need for nuclear power plants. they wrote renewables like wind and solar and biomass cannot scale up fast enoug
leaker, edward snowden. the nsa denied the tactic saying it gets data from such companies only through court orders. of course, all this comes after german chancellor angela merkel learned the u.s. had been monitoring her cell phone for years. now france and spain want to know if their calls were tapped too. vinita nair, cbs news, new york. >>> passengers on a delta flight have finally reached their destination this morning after an unscheduled stop at a very remote airport. they took off from tokyo yesterday morning bound for san francisco. an engine warning message led the crew to divert the plane to cold bay, alaska, in the aleutian islands. it's a barren town with about 160 people. the 167 passengers and 11 crew took off again ten hours later in a replacement plane. and i wonder if there were enough bathrooms. that's what you think when you're a lady. are there enough bathrooms. >>> straight ahead, concussion concerns. a new study raising questions about brain injuries in young athletes. this is the "cbs morning news." athletes. this is the "cbs morning news." and no fruit , is as
an open letter written by edward snowden. he says mass surveillance is a global problem, but the united states and british intelligence agencies are the worst defenders. snowden's manifesto follows his request for clemency. the obama administration won't each discuss it and says he should return to face justice. >>> yesterday a goal line stand the redskins made to keep the chargers out of the end zone, that is why the skins fans are waking up this morning. they came up out on top. quarterback darrell young scored three touchdowns including the game winner. it was a good coming out for him. rg iii 121 yards. skins improved to 5-3 on the season. >>> more people may be skeptical than excited about twitter's ipo. >> no doubt about the obenshain tried to outlaw. birth control pills. rape or incest. criminals, felons shows, a month law, in bulk. instead of dictating to women, criminals. this ad. >> just about 4:40 on this monday morning. some monuments are still lit up. enjoy it while we've got it. it is cold, upper 20s, mainly in the 30s, a sunny start, partly sunny finish, we should be in t
on the surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden, and secrets that are revealed are doing damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, mexico and other countries where the suggestion is that we've lisped in -- listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions it ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> it's a different view from the chairman of the house homeland security committee. congressman peter king says america should stop apologising for the nas. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives - not just the united states, but france, germany and throughout europe. the french carried out spying operations ai gaips the united states -- against the united states. as far as germany - that's where the hamburg plot began laing to nchb -- leading to 9/11. >> former secretary of state madeleine albright agrees, saying the u.s. is not the only one that spies on world leaders, but says france listened to her calls. a french ambassador once ask her about something she said on a private call. madeleine albright said: >> a roadside bo
leaked by whistle blower edward snowden in june revealing u.s. authorities are demanding internet companies hand them user information. as long as the national security agency or the fbi are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are theirs for the searching. carefully worded denils follow from the companies, arguing that they only give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case by case basis. these assurances have been left irrelevant sholling the number of sa -- showing the nsa has bypassed this, breaking into googles and yahoo!'s cables. citizens no longer receive protection awes all information is -- as all information is considered foreign. >> the government backs into the cables as a backdoor to get around the complaints. >> one thing is clear - any data protections that do exist are only for u.s. citizens. >> if you are not a citizen, if you are a non-american outside the united states, basically they have a free pass do what they like. >> the white house derives the authority from ex
edward snowden. also the best and worst places in the world to grow old. we'll take a look at where seniors are struggling - ahead. ed d . >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with the headlines tonight. charges have been filed against a suspect in the lax shooting that killed a t.s.a. officer. if convicted 23-year-old paul ciancia could face the death penalty. authorities say he left a note at the scene. >> he made a conscious decision to kill multiple t.s.a. in the employe employees, addressing them staying that he want to instill fear in their minds. >> healthcare.gov is down for maintenance - the website used to enrol in the insurance program and will be offline until 9am sunday morning. pakistan's wanted man was buried. taliban chief hakimullah mehsud was killed by a u.s. drone yesterday. supporters have threatened suicide bombings in revenge. hakimullah mehsud's death has pakistani politicians concerned about the future of peace talks with the taliban. we have more from peshawar. >> this is seen as a blow to the taliban pakistan, which may have a struggle
about -- tell us about this drawing that was leaked alodge with some other edward snowden documents. does it show how the nsa broke into google. >> >> yes, think of google as having multiple data centers around the world. what apparently, it did, the fiberoptic connections, they tabbed into. they put a clip on or had a way to monitor what was going through those fiberoptic cables. that's something we've learned from snowden that they've been doing around the world. but it's particularly disturbing that it's done with google. google is unique. it's the only entim tientity in that has a mission to collect all the world's snfgs. remember, the nsa is only collecting information about people that they think are a threat to the united states and others. >> so, scott, some of the biggest names in high-tech are now working with the obama administrati administration what does this say about the government's handle on tech nothing. >> i think it was obviously a black eye. something this big should have been rolled out with a lot more test iing. anybody that's in the business knows that you do
and four others wounded in the attack. >> edward snowden's plea for clementsy has been denied by the white house and congress. he made the plea in a letter. white house where are said edward snowden should return to the u.s. and face charges for allegedly leaking classified information. >> secretary of state john kerry's visit to the middle east - his stop in cairo was his first visit to egypt since mohamed morsi was deposed. john kerry insisted the withholding of aid to the military is not punishment. we discussed it earlier with military experts. >> he's trying to appeal to the public opinion. >> in egypt? >> in egypt, not the u.s. in egypt, after what happened last june or july, asking president mohamed morsi and the american reaction towards what happened, which a lot of egyptians thought was hostile and inappropriate. they thought the american government was siding with the muslim brotherhood. it created uneasy innocence. john kerry is trying hard to restore the image of the u.s., trying to build bridges with the egyptian government. >> should he be building a bridge with the governme
resident, edward snowden. spain is the latest nation, demanding answers from the u.s. danielle nottingham reports from wjz -- for wjz, from washington, d.c. >> reporter: a del delegation of diplomats arrived. >> i think we have to make a clear distinction between fighting together terrorism, but not spying on friends. >> reporter: former national security agency contractor, edward snowden, leaked documents, revealing that the u.s. tapped german chancellor angla merkel's private cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying u.s. intelligence gathering is under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department analyst james louis said the u.s. won't stop the program because in a post-9/11 world, the info
now. >>> edward snowden's request for clemency getting a thumbs down from the white house. >>> a fireball burning through a montreal neighborhood. >> oh my god that is not cool. >>> passengers at an airport were shocked when a small alligator was found under an escalator. >>> from 55 away, colts go to 6-2. >> seven touchdown passes for nick foles, that equals an nfl record. >> and all that matter. >> toronto's embattled mayor vows to ride the storm out after accusations he was caught on video smoking crack. >> i am not perfect. i have made mistakes. >>> auction day. >> oprah winfrey auctioned off some of her personal belongings over the weekend. >> usually gayle comes by my house on the weekends and says if you don't want that i do. >> announcer: "cbs this morning" brought to you by toyota, let's go places. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." norah o'donnell is off. margaret brennan is with us. good morning. >> it is so great to be here with you charlie. >>> we begin here the man charged with killing a tsa officer at los angeles international airport, investigators say paul
to the "washington post" and documents it obtained from the nsa leaker edward snowden. according to this report, field collectors processed, get this, 181,28 181,280,466 new records in one month. an operation of this kind in the united states is illegal. of course the nsa is allowed to operate overseas but not here. what from google and yahoo. released a statement saying the company is troubled by the allegation. a yahoo spokeswoman says we have not given access to our data centers to the nsa or any other government agency. clearly that is not the accusation. the accusation is that the nsa broke in, not that anybody gave anybody permission. in other words, the nsa broke the law. of course there's more. an italian magazine reports that the nsa may have spied on the pope and some cardinals. sources say the magazine -- sources at the magazine have been told that the nsa eavesdropped on vatican phone calls possibly around the time the former pope benedict's successor was under discussion. possibly, it reports before the conclave that top secret meeting of cardinals. a vatican spokesman could not or
condition. what investigators have uncovered about a possible motive for that attack. >>> and edward snowden is out with a new manifesto and is asking for clemency from the u.s. why he basically says he did the american government a favor. that's next. i'm a careful investor. when you do what i do, you think about risk. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further dam
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